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Wednesday, October 31, 2012

'Economic Effects of Hurricane Sandy'

Jim Hamilton on the economic damage from hurricane Sandy:

... One parallel to consider is the devastation from Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In addition to the short-run dislocations, this ended up causing lasting damage to offshore oil-producing infrastructure. An optimist might have thought this would create all kinds of new jobs trying to rebuild. The actual experience was not so cheerful.

Econbrowser-1

Seasonally adjusted nonfarm employment in Louisiana, 2004:M1 - 2007:M12, in thousands of workers. Vertical line marks Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. Data source: BLS.

The Wall Street Journal reports that IHS estimates that Hurricane Sandy could reduce the 2012:Q4 U.S. real GDP growth rate by 0.6 percentage points at an annual rate. I'm not sure how one comes up with that kind of number. But I am persuaded this was not a good thing for the U.S. economy.

    Posted by on Wednesday, October 31, 2012 at 12:32 PM Permalink  Comments (12)

          


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