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Monday, February 03, 2014

'Keystone: The Pipeline to Disaster'

In case you want to talk about this (I don't have a well-formed opinion on the pipeline itself, I haven't done enough reading about it, so hoping to learn something from the comments):

Keystone: The Pipeline to Disaster, by Jeff Sachs: The new State Department Environmental Impact Statement for the Keystone Pipeline does three things. First, it signals a greater likelihood that the pipeline project will be approved... Second, it vividly illustrates the depth of confusion of US climate change policy. Third, it self-portrays the US Government as a helpless bystander to climate calamity.. ...
The pipeline will ... facilitate the mass extraction and use of Canada's enormous unconventional supplies. Therein lies the problem. ... The economic implications of the climate science are clear. Either we keep some of the world's oil, gas, and coal reserves under the ground..., or we wreck the planet. ... The most important single step is to keep most of the coal from being burned. ...
The Keystone pipeline is crucial to the global carbon budget. If the world deploys massive unconventional oil sources like Canada's oil sands we will exceed the carbon budget,... cheaper, (relatively) cleaner, and lower-CO2 oil is available. ...
Herein lies the tragic, indeed fatal, flaw of the State Department review. The ... State Department simply assumes ... that the oil sands will be developed and used one way or another. ... According to the State Department, in other words, the US Government is just a passive spectator to global climate change. Either the pipeline is built or the oil will be shipped by other means. ...
But do not lose hope. ... The vast majority of Americans want safety for themselves, their children, and the rest of humanity. Our generation can still turn the tide against environmental disaster.

    Posted by on Monday, February 3, 2014 at 12:11 PM in Economics, Environment, Oil | Permalink  Comments (106)

          


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