« 'Did Robert Bork Understate the Competitive Impact of Mergers?' | Main | 'Redistribution, Inequality, and Sustainable Growth: Reconsidering the Evidence' »

Thursday, March 06, 2014

'Why DRM'ed Coffee-Pods May be Just the Awful Stupidity We Need'

Speaking of anti-competitive behavior, here's Cory Doctorow:

Why DRM'ed coffee-pods may be just the awful stupidity we need, by Cory Doctorow: I've been thinking about the news that Keurig has added "DRM" to its pod coffee-makers since the story first started doing the rounds a couple of days ago. I've come to the conclusion that while the errand is a foolish one, and the company deserves nothing but contempt for such an anti-competitive move, that there might be a silver lining to this cloud. As I've written recently, there's not a lot of case-law on Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), the law that prohibits "circumventing...effective means of access control" to copyrighted works. In the past, we've seen printer companies and garage door opener manufacturers claim that the software in their devices was a "copyrighted work" and that anyone who made a spare part for their products was thus violating 1201. But that was 10 years ago, and it's been a while since there was someone stupid and greedy enough to try that defense.
I think Keurig might just be that stupid, greedy company. The reason they're adding "DRM" to their coffee pods is that they don't think that they make the obviously best product at the best price, but want to be able to force their customers to buy from them anyway. So when, inevitably, their system is cracked by a competitor who puts better coffee at a lower price into the pods, Keurig strikes me as the kind of company that might just sue. And not only sue, but keep on suing, even after they get their asses handed to them by successive courts. With any luck, they'll make some new appellate-level caselaw in a circuit where there's a lot of startups -- maybe by bringing a case against some spunky Research Triangle types in the Fourth Circuit.
Now, this is risky. Hard cases made bad law. A judge in a circuit where copyright claims are rarely heard might just buy the idea of copyright covering pods of coffee. The rebel forces that Keurig sues might be idiots (remember Aimster?). But of all the DRM Death Stars to be unveiled, Keurig's is a pretty good candidate for Battle Station Most Likely to Have a Convenient Thermal Exhaust Port.

[Boing Boing is licensed under a Creative Commons License permitting non-commercial sharing with attribution.]

    Posted by on Thursday, March 6, 2014 at 08:40 AM in Economics, Market Failure, Regulation | Permalink  Comments (6)

          


    Comments

    Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.