« Paul Krugman: Who Wants a Depression? | Main | Links for 7-12-14 »

Friday, July 11, 2014

'Rereading Lucas and Sargent 1979'

Simon Wren-Lewis with a nice follow-up to an earlier discussion:

Rereading Lucas and Sargent 1979: Mainly for macroeconomists and those interested in macroeconomic thought
Following this little interchange (me, Mark Thoma, Paul Krugman, Noah Smith, Robert Waldman, Arnold Kling), I reread what could be regarded as the New Classical manifesto: Lucas and Sargent’s ‘After Keynesian Economics’ (hereafter LS). It deserves to be cited as a classic, both for the quality of ideas and the persuasiveness of the writing. It does not seem like something written 35 ago, which is perhaps an indication of how influential its ideas still are.
What I want to explore is whether this manifesto for the New Classical counter revolution was mainly about stagflation, or whether it was mainly about methodology. LS kick off their article with references to stagflation and the failure of Keynesian theory. A fundamental rethink is required. What follows next is I think crucial. If the counter revolution is all about stagflation, we might expect an account of why conventional theory failed to predict stagflation - the equivalent, perhaps, to the discussion of classical theory in the General Theory. Instead we get something much more general - a discussion of why identification restrictions typically imposed in the structural econometric models (SEMs) of the time are incredible from a theoretical point of view, and an outline of the Lucas critique.
In other words, the essential criticism in LS is methodological: the way empirical macroeconomics has been done since Keynes is flawed. SEMs cannot be trusted as a guide for policy. In only one paragraph do LS try to link this general critique to stagflation...[continue]...

    Posted by on Friday, July 11, 2014 at 08:28 AM in Economics, Macroeconomics, Methodology | Permalink  Comments (55)

          


    Comments

    Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.