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Monday, August 11, 2014

'Celebrating Greenspan's Legacy of Failure'

Barry Ritholtz:

Celebrating Greenspan's Legacy of Failure: On this day in 1987, Alan Greenspan became chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. This anniversary allows us to take a quick look at what followed over the next two decades. As it turned out, it was one of the most interesting and, to be blunt, weirdest tenures ever for a Fed chairman.
This was largely because of the strange ways Greenspan's infatuation with the philosophy of Ayn Rand manifested themselves. He was a free marketer who loved to intervene in the markets, a chief bank regulator who seemingly failed to understand even the most basic premise of bank regulations. ...
The contradictions between Greenspan's philosophy and his actions led to many key events over his career. The ones that stand out the most in my mind are as follows...

Barry concludes with:

It's worth noting that, Greenspan’s intellectual hero, Rand, also turned her back on her own philosophy, living off of Social Security and other government aid before she died of cancer in 1982.
In the end, a central banker cannot be both concerned with asset prices yet comfortable with collapsing bubbles. These are inherently contradictory beliefs. That is why Greenspan’s tenure was both disastrous and fascinating.

    Posted by on Monday, August 11, 2014 at 08:23 AM in Economics, Monetary Policy | Permalink  Comments (19)

          


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