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Thursday, October 02, 2014

Why is our Infant Mortality so Bad?

Aaron Carroll:

So why is our infant mortality so bad?: ...Everyone knows that in international comparisons, the infant mortality rate in the US is terrible. Some people think it’s because we code things differently and try harder to save premature babies. Others think that’s not true, and that this points to other problems in the health care system.
As always, though, it’s probably a mixture of many things. A new NBER working paper gets at just that. “Why is Infant Mortality Higher in the US than in Europe?” ... What did they find?
Reporting differences ... explained up to 40% of the disadvantage in US infant mortality. But that would only get us closer. It would still leave us way worse. ... What accounted for the real disadvantage was postneonatal mortality, or mortality from one month to one year of age. That difference was almost entirely due to excess inequality in the US. ...
So there are two main takeaways from this paper. The first is that although reporting differences can account for some of our worse infant mortality statistics, most of the differences we see are not due to that explanation. The second is that most of the rest of the disadvantage is due to differences in postneonatal mortality, that likely require fixes to the healthcare system. Whether the ACA does so remains to be seen.

    Posted by on Thursday, October 2, 2014 at 08:50 AM in Economics, Health Care, Income Distribution | Permalink  Comments (22)


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