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Wednesday, November 04, 2015

'60% of Ted Cruz‘s Tax Cut Goes to the Top 1%'

James Kwak at The Baseline Scenario:

60% of Ted Cruz‘s Tax Cut Goes to the Top 1%: I haven’t been commenting on Republican tax plans this season because, well, it takes a lot to impress me when it comes to absurd tax cut proposals. Ted Cruz has done it. The major components of Cruz’s plan amount to this:

  • A flat 10% tax on individual income (labor and investments)—down from top rates today of 43.4% on labor and 23.8% on capital gains and dividends
  • No payroll taxes (15.3% for most people today), corporate income tax (average rate about 13% today), or estate tax
  • A 19% value-added tax (16% of gross business receipts, including the tax)

There are two big things that are crazy about this plan. The first is that it eliminates an enormous amount of tax revenue: $3.6 trillion over ten years, according to the right-wing Tax Foundation’s “static” analysis—that is, before the growth fairy waves her magic wand. To put that in context, that’s more than we plan to spend on the military over the next ten years.

The second is the astonishingly naked handout to the very rich:

60% of the tax cut goes to the top 1%.

That leaves only 40% for everyone else. This number is so embarrassing that you won’t find it in the Tax Foundation’s analysis. ...

Of course, none of this should be any surprise. Republican tax proposals became completely divorced from reality long ago. More importantly, the Republican nomination lies in the hands of a handful of donors who are in the 0.001%, so the rational thing for any candidate to do is pander to them as enthusiastically as possible.

The only policies we have that limit the transmission of wealth from generation to generation are the estate tax and taxes on investment income. Eliminating one and slashing the other, as Ted Cruz proposes, is the single biggest step we can take toward becoming an aristocracy of inherited wealth. As a member of the 1%, that would be good for my grandchildren—but it would be bad for the country.

[I left out quite a bit of the original post.]

    Posted by on Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 12:32 PM in Economics, Politics, Taxes | Permalink  Comments (25)


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