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Wednesday, March 02, 2016

'Four Common-Sense Ideas for Economic Growth'

Larry Summers:

Four common-sense ideas for economic growth: Let me begin with two facts that I think should be cause for concern. First, since the summer of 2009, the US economy has grown at about 2 percent. Two percent isn't a very good growth rate. Second, the 10-year interest rate at the end of trading today ... was just a bit below 1.8 percent. ...
What’s the way to think about these two facts together? I believe that we are dealing with a situation that goes beyond the usual cyclical issues associated with recession—and for many years the policy debate has been confounded by that. The Fed has been substantially too optimistic in its one-year-ahead forecast every year for the last six, and its forecasts are pretty close to the consensus forecasts. The prevailing expectation in markets has always been that significant tightening will take place in nine months. That’s been true for the last six years. It has not happened yet.
If you accept all of this, what should be done? I would suggest four things at a minimum. First, there is an overwhelming case in the United States for expanded public infrastructure investment. ... It’s hard to imagine a better time for expanded infrastructure investment, yet the rate of infrastructure investment is lower now than it’s been anytime since 1947. ...
Second, we should increase support for private investment in infrastructure. ...
Third, we should grow our effective labor force. ...
Fourth, our financial system requires continuing attention. ...
I would say to you that whatever you care about, if all you care about is that we’ve got an excessive federal debt, the most important determinant of the debt-to-GDP ratio in 2030 is how rapidly the economy grows between now and then. If what you care about is American national security, the most important determinant of how much we are respected and how much influence we have in the world is how well our economy performs. If what you care about is inequality and poverty, the most important determinant of the employment prospects of the poor is how rapidly the economy is growing.
I would suggest to you that there is no more important question for the American prospect than accelerating the rate of economic growth. It seems to me, whether you’re a demand sider or a supply sider, a Democrat or a Republican, there’s a great deal of common sense that should lead you to support increased economic growth.

[There is quite a bit of discussion of each point in the full post.]

    Posted by on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 09:57 AM in Economics, Fiscal Policy, Monetary Policy | Permalink  Comments (68)


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