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Thursday, March 31, 2016

'Modelling Banking Sector Shocks and Unconventional Policy: New Wine in Old Bottles?'

This is from the B of E's Bank Underground:

Modelling banking sector shocks and unconventional policy: new wine in old bottles?, by James Cloyne, Ryland Thomas, and Alex Tuckett: The financial crisis has thrown up a huge number of empirical challenges for academic and professional economists. The search is on for a framework with a rich enough variety of financial and real variables to examine both the financial shocks that caused the Great Recession and the unconventional policies, such as Quantitative Easing (QE), that were designed to combat it. In a new paper we show how using an older structural econometric modelling approach can be used to provide insights into these questions in ways other models currently cannot. So what are the advantages of going back to an older tradition of modelling? An ongoing issue for central bank economists is that they typically want to look at a wide range of financial sector variables and at a more granular, sector-based level of aggregation than typically found in macroeconomic models with credit and asset market frictions. For example, we often want to distinguish between the credit provided to firms separately from that provided to households or between secured lending and unsecured lending. We may also want to compare and contrast a number of policy instruments that work through different channels such as central bank asset purchases (QE) and macroprudential tools such as countercyclical capital requirements.
It is a tough challenge to incorporate all of these effects in the theoretical and empirical models that are typically used by macroeconomists, such as structural vector autoregression (SVAR) models and micro-founded general equilibrium (DSGE) models. For these reasons turning back to the older tradition of building structural econometric models (SEMs) – built from blocks of simultaneously estimated equations with structural identifying restrictions – can be useful. This approach can be thought of as a blend of the more theory-free VAR methods and a more structural model-based approach. The main advantage of the structural econometric frameworks are that they produce quantitative results at a sector level, which can still be aggregated up to produce a general equilibrium response. They also allow models to be built up in a modular way that allows replacing and improving sets of equations for particular blocks of the model without necessarily undermining the logic of the model as a whole. This older school approach to modelling has begun to appear in a variety of modern vintages. ...

    Posted by on Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 07:16 AM in Econometrics, Economics, Financial System, Monetary Policy | Permalink  Comments (0)


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