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Saturday, April 16, 2016

The Return of Elasticity Pessimism

Paul Krugman:

The Return of Elasticity Pessimism (Wonkish): I talked at the Council for European Studies conference in Philly last night, and was surprised by one aspect of the discussion. As you might expect if you’re into these things, my take on the euro was strongly informed by the theory of Optimum Currency Areas; I expected pushback. But I didn’t realize how many people now seem to believe that real exchange rates don’t matter for adjustment — that is, that even internal devaluation (downward adjustment of prices and wages relative to trading partners) isn’t necessary in the aftermath of unsustainable capital inflows.
It turns out ... that we’re seeing a significant revival of the “elasticity pessimism” widely prevalent during the post World War II “dollar shortage”. This was the belief that trade flows barely respond to price signals, and hence that devaluations don’t help alleviate imbalances. Now as then, the argument rests in large part on specific cases...
The difference is that in the late 1940s this kind of argument was deployed in support of more government intervention — keep those exchange controls in place, because devaluation won’t work — whereas now it’s being deployed as an argument against activism — never mind the euro, it’s all rigidities that must be cured with structural reform. ...
I guess I’m showing a strong preconception here — that done right, analysis will show that trade elasticities remain fairly large. Certainly willing to be proved wrong — but we need to do this carefully, because it’s really important for future policy.

    Posted by on Saturday, April 16, 2016 at 10:32 AM in Economics, International Finance | Permalink  Comments (54)


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