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Monday, February 13, 2017

A Credible and Bold Basic Income

Thomas Piketty:

Is our basic income really universal?: After our call « For a credible and bold basic income » launched by a group of ten researchers  (Antoine Bozio, Thomas Breda, Julia Cagé, Lucas Chancel, Elise Huillery, Camille Landais, Dominique Méda, Emmanuel Saez, Tancrède Voituriez), we received considerable support and also, of course, questions and requests for clarification. The first question was: Given that the system of a basic income which we propose does not defend the idea of an identical monthly allowance paid to each individual, is it really universal? The question is legitimate and I would like to reply here as clearly as possible. ...

Background (from the link in the excerpt):

...The goals of the candidates standing in the presidential primary elections launched by the left must be judged on the relevance of their proposals, their impact on the recovery of economic activity and employment in France, and their effect on social cohesion in the country.
The economic and fiscal policy adopted during François Hollande’s five-year term of office has prevented France from engaging in the dynamics of strong and sustainable economic recovery. The choice made in 2012 to forcibly impose an increase in taxes and reduce deficits in a period of recession killed any hope of growth. The numerous warnings launched in this respect remained unanswered. Those who bear the responsibility for this disastrous policy and who claim to have had no part in it must be held to account today.
In the ongoing debates in the primaries, discussions are crystallizing around a new issue: a basic income (in French sometime referred to as a « revenu universel » or « revenu de base »). Benoît Hamon is faced with the accusation that he is incompetent to govern because he introduced this proposal. According to his critics, the introduction of a basic income would mean bankruptcy for France. The accusation is easily made but over-hasty. Economically and socially, a basic income can be both relevant and innovative. It could be quite the reverse of the fiscal and budgetary choices made in 2012 and in particular the incredibly complex and inefficient tax credit for competitivity and employment, not to mention the exoneration of overtime which even the right wing has abandoned and Manuel Valls would like to bring back today. Properly designed and defined, the basic income can be a structuring element in a new foundation for our social model. ...

    Posted by on Monday, February 13, 2017 at 12:24 AM in Economics, Social Insurance | Permalink  Comments (22)


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