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Wednesday, September 29, 2010

"Employers Aren’t Trying Hard to Hire"

Mark Whitehouse at Real Time Economics notes that if the unemployment problem is mainly structural rather than cyclical, hiring intensity ought to be going up, not down::

Employers Aren’t Trying Hard to Hire, by Mark Whitehouse: Unemployed workers have a point when they complain that companies aren’t really trying to fill open jobs, a new study suggests.
In recent months, policy makers have puzzled over the inadequate rate at which job searchers and job vacancies are coming together. ...
Explanations have tended to focus on workers. Extended unemployment benefits could make people less willing to take jobs that pay poorly or don’t quite fit. Mortgage troubles and employed spouses could make it harder for people to move for work. People might not have the right qualifications for the jobs available.
A new paper, though, suggests employers themselves are at least part of the problem. The authors — Steven Davis of Chicago Booth School of Business, R. Jason Faberman of the Philadelphia Fed and John Haltiwanger of the University of Maryland — take a deep dive into Labor Department data and come up with an estimate of what they call “recruiting intensity,” a measure of employers’ vacancy-filling efforts including advertising, screening and wage offers.
Their finding: Employers haven’t been trying as hard as they usually do. Estimates provided by Mr. Davis suggest that over the three months ending July, recruiting intensity was about 12% below the average for the seven years leading up to the recession. Their lack of effort probably accounts for about a quarter of the shortfall in the hiring rate.
Depressing as it might seem, the finding is in some ways encouraging. It suggests that the trouble with hiring might be more a “cyclical” function of low business confidence than a chronic, “structural” ailment that will last for years to come.

In other news, some members of the Fed are finally waking up:

Fed's Kocherlakota revises down forecast, by CalculatedRisk: Minneapolis Federal Reserve President Narayana Kocherlakota spoke in London today. He has been one of more optimistic Fed presidents, and he revised down his forecast today ...

Kocherlakota ... still seems too optimistic, but he is moving in the right direction.

And on the coming QE2:

My own guess is that further uses of QE would have a more muted effect on Treasury term premia. Financial markets are functioning much better in late 2010 than they were in early 2009. As a result, the relevant spreads are lower, and I suspect that it will be somewhat more challenging for the Fed to impact them.

...It is interesting that certain Fed presidents are now revising down their overly optimistic forecasts - all but guaranteeing QE2 (even if he thinks it will have little impact).

If only they'd listen:

...presently the Fed does not feel the benefits [of further action]outweigh the costs, and it remains in “wait and see” mode.
My first question for the Fed would be this. To date, you have overestimated the strength of the recovery at every step. ... Given the forecasts to this point, all of which have been too rosy, I would place more weight on the downside, quite a bit more...
So, in my view, the Fed should drop its relatively rosy forecast for the recovery and take more account of the downside risks, the Fed should place more weight on the unemployment problem, and have less fear of inflation — the risk right now is in the other direction. Making these adjustments that would compel the Fed to action instead of “waiting and seeing,” a policy that, to date, has kept the Fed from getting out in front of the economy’s problem.
It’s time for the Fed to stop playing catch-up as it waits and sees that its forecasts were wrong, and and take the steps needed to boost the economy. ...

and:

People need jobs, or more social support until jobs appear, and both the Congress and the Fed are failing to do all that they can do to help. Apparently, imagined fears of deficits and inflation are more important than the real struggles of the unemployed.

    Posted by on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 at 12:19 PM in Economics, Monetary Policy, Unemployment | Permalink  Comments (64)


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