« Paul Krugman: Leaving Children Behind | Main | The Fed's Hawkish Stance »

Monday, February 28, 2011

Brad DeLong: Pain without Purpose

Brad DeLong:

Pain without Purpose, by Brad DeLong, Commentary, Project Syndicate: ...Today, we face a nominal demand shortfall of 8% relative to the pre-recession trend, no signs of gathering inflation, and unemployment rates ... at least three percentage points higher than any credible estimate of the sustainable rate. And yet,... somehow,... cures are now off the table. There is no likelihood of reforms of Wall Street and Canary Wharf aimed at diminishing the likelihood and severity of any future financial panic, and no likelihood of government intervention to restore the normal flow of risky finance through the banking system. Nor is there any political pressure to expand or even extend the anemic government stimulus measures that have been undertaken.
Meanwhile, the European Central Bank is actively looking for ways to shrink the supply of financial assets that it provides to the private sector, and the US Federal Reserve is under pressure to do the same. In both cases, it is claimed that further expansionary asset-provision policies run the risk of igniting inflation.
Yet no likelihood of inflation can be seen when tracking price indexes or financial-market readings of forecast expectations. And no approaching government debt crisis in the core economies can be seen when tracking government interest rates.
Nevertheless,... you hear presidents and prime ministers say things like: “Just as families and companies have had to be cautious about spending, government must tighten its belt as well.”
And here we reach the limits of my mental horizons as a neoliberal, as a technocrat, and as a mainstream neoclassical economist. Right now, the global economy is suffering a grand mal seizure of slack demand and high unemployment. We know the cures. Yet we seem determined to inflict further suffering on the patient.

    Posted by on Monday, February 28, 2011 at 11:43 AM Permalink  Comments (22)


    Comments

    Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.