« Paul Krugman: Those Depressing Germans | Main | 'Why Doesn’t Competition Drive Out Inefficient Health Care Technology?' »

Monday, November 04, 2013

'Women in Economics in the Chronicle of Higher Education'

John Whitehead:

Women in economics in the Chronicle of Higher Education: Kate Bahn ("a doctoral student in economics at the New School for Social Research and a writer and co-editor at LadyEconomist.com) in the Chronicle:

So the problem is really twofold: Women have been discouraged and excluded, and those who make an impact anyway have had their contributions discredited. ...

So that’s the state of play. That said, women have made huge gains in the field over the past 40 years..., 35 percent of new economics Ph.D.’s are women, up from about 7 percent in the 1970s.

Dig a little deeper, though, and the signs are less encouraging. ...

A disproportionate number of women remain stuck in certain subfields. ... Women are drawn to those areas where they are already better represented. So while there are pockets of female economists within certain subfields, there’s still a major disparity across the field as a whole. ...

In the coming months, I’ll write more about what this all means, for women and for the field as a whole. For now, I won’t delve too deeply into my experiences as an openly feminist economist and the eye-rolls I get from some of my peers whenever I suggest we hold more lectures and classes on feminist economics. Discussing that subfield just opens up a whole other can of worms, except yuck, girls don’t like worms.

This should be an interesting series.

Twenty-eight percent of our sample of AERE members are women and there are some gender differences on some of the items... I'm not sure where environmental and resource economics falls in the quant to caring field range. Probably closer to caring? Since we *might* care more about environmental issues than other economists?

    Posted by on Monday, November 4, 2013 at 09:25 AM in Economics, Universities | Permalink  Comments (5)


    Comments

    Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.