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Friday, October 03, 2014

Paul Krugman: Depression Denial Syndrome

What is the price for getting it wrong?:

Depression Denial Syndrome, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: Last week, Bill Gross, the so-called bond king, abruptly left Pimco, the investment firm he had managed for decades. People who follow the financial industry were shocked but not exactly surprised; tales of internal troubles at Pimco had been all over the papers. But why should you care?
The answer is that Mr. Gross’s fall is a symptom of a malady that continues to afflict major decision-makers, public and private. Call it depression denial syndrome: the refusal to acknowledge that the rules are different in a persistently depressed economy. ...
Now, we normally think of deficits as a bad thing — government borrowing competes with private borrowing, driving up interest rates, hurting investment... But, since 2008, we have ... been stuck in a liquidity trap... In this situation,... deficits needn’t cause interest rates to rise. ...
All this may sound strange and counterintuitive, but it’s what basic macroeconomic analysis tells you. ... But many, perhaps most, influential people in the alleged real world refused to believe...
Which brings me back to Mr. Gross.
For a time, Pimco — where Paul McCulley, a managing director at the time, was one of the leading voices explaining the logic of the liquidity trap — seemed admirably calm about deficits, and did very well as a result. ...
Then something changed. Mr. McCulley left Pimco at the end of 2010..., and Mr. Gross joined the deficit hysterics, declaring that low interest rates were “robbing” investors and selling off all his holdings of U.S. debt. In particular, he predicted a spike in interest rates when the Fed ended a program of debt purchases in June 2011. He was completely wrong, and neither he nor Pimco ever recovered.
So is this an edifying tale in which bad ideas were proved wrong by experience, people’s eyes were opened, and truth prevailed? Sorry, no. In fact, it’s very hard to find any examples of people who have changed their minds. People who were predicting soaring inflation and interest rates five years ago are still predicting soaring inflation and interest rates today, vigorously rejecting any suggestion that they should reconsider their views in light of experience.
And that’s what makes the Bill Gross story interesting. He’s pretty much the only major deficit hysteric to pay a price for getting it wrong (even though he remains, of course, immensely rich). Pimco has taken a hit, but everywhere else the reign of error continues undisturbed.

    Posted by on Friday, October 3, 2014 at 12:24 AM in Budget Deficit, Economics | Permalink  Comments (83)


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